Can I Afford Recovery?

Addiction can rob you of resources, financial or otherwise. But finances shouldn't be a barrier to recovery. Here's what to look for when tailoring a plan to your needs

February 3, 2023
Woman balancing her finances at a computer

How will I pay for it? It’s a very common worry among people considering treatment for addiction. After all, in pop culture, “recovery” often looks like a fancy rehab retreat in the mountains or near the ocean, with horseback-riding therapy and TV-ready treatment pros.

And you know what? Those exist, and they can be life-changing for patients. But there are many paths to recovery, and more than a few are budget-friendly or even free.

It’s understandable, then, to feel a little choice overload: With a wide range of possibilities, it can be daunting to sift through the options and find the best treatment plan for you. And although some people have insurance or financial support from loved ones, finances shouldn’t be a barrier to healing for others.

The most important factor is not financial: Once a person commits to recovery and sober life, there’s an open road to success that lies before them. The goal above all is healing and empowerment.

A well-rounded addiction recovery plan is rooted in each person’s individual needs, preferences and circumstances. Every person healing from addiction deserves to have access to meaningful resources, and there are local and national nonprofits committed to helping you find them.

What Does a Well-Rounded Addiction Treatment Look Like?

An ideal addiction treatment plan puts the client and their unique needs at the forefront. So each treatment plan will look a little different for each person.

Honoring the individual in treatment by listening to and respecting their needs increases success in recovery. What you want when creating or selecting a treatment plan is a recovery team that values your individual needs and preferences. Depending on the severity of your addiction, that could mean starting with a detox program or inpatient treatment.

The People in Your Corner: Your Support Network

Addiction and early recovery are bewildering enough; you don’t need to go it alone when figuring out treatment and recovery options. Your support system must be strong, reliable and honest when discussing potential treatment options. Weighing your best options with others who know and value you can result in lasting success in recovery.

The most vital part of a successful addiction treatment plan is building the right team to support your recovery. Some of your teammates are already in your life, and some you’ll find during this process. A strong support network might include:

  • A trusted medical professional or team of professionals
  • Your close loved ones
  • A mentor, sponsor or sober companion
  • A caseworker or case manager
  • Other supportive communities and groups

Note that most of these folks will charge you little or nothing.

Your Trusted Medical Professional(s)

The right medical professional understands and values you as a person. Whether you’re working with one person or a whole staff, it is imperative that you feel safe, valued and heard.

The development of your recovery plan must be collaborative and transparent. As your health care team helps address and treat your addiction and any underlying concerns, they can also facilitate detox programs and inpatient care when necessary.

Your Close Loved Ones

Including your loved ones in your recovery journey can promote both your healing and theirs. Addiction usually impacts our loved ones, so make them a part of recovery too. If you can heal together, it will be easier to move forward with healthy communication, relationships and trust-building or -repairing.

A Mentor, Sponsor or Sober Companion

A mentor can inspire you to stay motivated throughout your recovery process.

A mentor lends a kind presence while offering insight and wisdom from similar experiences — they can directly relate to what you’re going through. Depending on your needs, a mentor can accompany you throughout your recovery journey, helping you adjust to sobriety.

A Caseworker or Case Manager

A case manager can help keep the logistics of your addiction treatment plan in order.

Depending on the complexity of your circumstances, a case manager can be helpful in managing the details of your treatment, such as billing and scheduling. These nitty-gritty concerns may be minor or routine, but they add up, so the case manager takes on the work of addiction treatment to make it easier for you to be present with the treatment itself.

Other Supportive Communities and Groups

Finding communities and groups that speak to your beliefs and passions can be helpful; most people in recovery would even say it’s essential.

A recovery community or support group that you click with guarantees a safe space where you can meet new people and make genuine and fulfilling connections. Engaging in something that inspires a sense of shared purpose and drive is also beneficial.

You’ll need to draw on your own strength and determination in recovery, but having a solid team of caring individuals — a support network — is vital as well.

So, What Will It Cost?

A team of individuals who can advocate for and encourage you is crucial to a successful and well-rounded addiction treatment plan. These individuals will be with you for the long haul. They are just as committed to your recovery as you are.

There is a broad spectrum when it comes to financial requirements and considerations for addiction treatment. There are some great free and affordable options for most of the services required for a well-rounded treatment plan. Friends, mentors and support groups are generally free or low-cost. Financial assistance or scholarships are available for many professional services and treatment programs.

It’s certainly possible to find more intricate and high-end programs if money is no object. There are plenty of great treatment options along the scale between free and pricey as well.

By carefully weighing your options and knowing where you can find help and support, it is possible to overcome addiction and succeed in recovery. Much of the cost of treatment and recovery is, or can be, up to you.

So don’t let your financial situation deter you. If you’re ready and willing to heal and grow, you will find the right tools and resources to help you forge your new path.

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